Career Harvest

Passionate about climate change? There’s a job for you!

Published on April 16, 2015 by Career Harvest

Climate change is a big issue that affects us all on so many levels and is an issue students learn about from a very young age. This early grounding means they remain passionate about climate change issues right through their education and many want to do something in their careers to help solve some of the problems. Studying agriculture is a way to make a tangible impact on this massive issue.

The food and fibre industries are hugely affected by climate change, but equally are contributors to the factors that are causing problems as well. There are so many ways students can work in the industry to influence climate change.

A snapshot from just this week in agriculture highlights some of the ways the industry is addressing the issue:

  • Apple and pear production – With mean temperatures in Australian apple and pear growing regions predicted to increase by up to 1.2 degrees by 2030, a Horticulture Innovation Australia (HIA) project is aiming to reduce the vulnerability of fruit production to a changing climate. “It is not yet clear how warmer average temperatures and increased frequency of extreme heat days will impact on apple and pear production, which is why this research is so important.” – From a Horticulture Innovation Australia press release 15/4 
  • Pig production – 27% of large scale piggeries generate power on farm from methane requiring the power industry to review regulations – From an ABC Rural story 16/4
  • Feeding the World – The Youth Ag Summit announced 100 young delegates from 33 countries that will attend a summit in Canberra to address how agriculture will feed the world in 2050
  • Orchards: A Western Australian horticulture research project has found growers can make water savings of more than 40 per cent, by netting orchards. – From an ABC Rural story 16/4 

We could go on and on, but the message remains – are you or do you know a student passionate about climate change? Study ag!

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